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Jan
24

One Day

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One day the members of the heavenly court came to present themselves before the Lord, and the Accuser, Satan, came with them. “Where have you come from?” the Lord asked Satan. Satan answered the Lord, “I have been patrolling the earth, watching everything that’s going on.”
Then the Lord asked Satan, “Have you noticed my servant Job? He is the finest man in all the earth. He is blameless—a man of complete integrity. He fears God and stays away from evil.”
Satan replied to the Lord, “Yes, but Job has good reason to fear God. You have always put a wall of protection around him and his home and his property. You have made him prosper in everything he does. Look how rich he is! But reach out and take away everything he has, and he will surely curse you to your face!” “All right, you may test him,” the Lord said to Satan. “Do whatever you want with everything he possesses, but don’t harm him physically.” So Satan left the Lord’s presence.
(Job 1:6-12, NLT)

On May 1, 1915, nearly 2,000 passengers boarded a luxury ocean liner at Pier 54 in New York destined for Liverpool, England. People were anxious, because Great Britain and Germany were at war, and the charted course would call for the Lusitania to navigate dangerous waters. Germany had placed ads in American newspapers warning them not to travel on British ships, and many heeded the warning. However, approximately 200 Americans chose to take the risk and make the trip. The first several days of the journey were uneventful, but on the morning of May 7, the ship found itself in dense fog and 100 miles from its destination. As the fog lifted around noon, a German U-boat spotted the Lusitania and fired a torpedo into the starboard side of the ship. The explosion triggered a second explosion, and within 20 minutes the ship turned on its side and sank. The tragic event was instrumental in the United States decision to enter what we now refer to as World War I. And it all happened as the result of one day.

The story of Job begins by introducing him as a man who was, in the words of God, “the finest man on earth.” This introduction is followed by a conversation that is staged at the throne of God in the heavenlies. We are presented with “the Satan,” who is pictured as wandering the earth. Though he wanders, his wandering is not aimless. This adversarial accuser stands poised to create mischief throughout the earth. The reader is reminded of Peter’s description in 1 Peter 5:8 where he reminds us that Satan “roams the earth, to and fro, seeking whom he may devour.”

As the conversation unfolds, God points out his servant Job. Satan immediately flung his arrows of accusation, claiming that the only reason Job is devout is because God has blessed him and protected him from harm. Inherent in this accusation is the finger pointed at God, suggesting that God has blessed Job in exchange for his devotion. So a challenged is proposed: take all that he has and Job will no longer worship God. The challenge is accepted, with limitation. Satan is released to undertake his work, but forbidden to touch Job himself.

The essence of the challenge is this. Is God so good he can be loved for himself? Will a person hold on to God when there are no benefits attached? The test of Job is a good question for us. Do we love God for who he is? Or do we love him for the gifts he bestows?

Several years ago I had the opportunity to participate in a mission trip to the rural regions of Haiti. It was less than primitive. We were 100 miles from a telephone. The nearest power outlet was the same distance. The terrain was so rugged it took nearly 17 hours and 5 tire changes just to get to the orphanage where we would stay. It was third world conditions.

To our surprise, the first morning we were awakened at dawn by the local villagers having choir practice. These men and women sang in full voice, brimming with joy and enthusiasm. My friend Greg, who was on the trip, made an observation I’ll never forget. He said, “If these people, living in these conditions, can sing like that at 5:30 in the morning, I’ll never complain about singing in church again!” These Haitian men and women loved God for who he is, no strings attached. And we will soon find that Job did too.

Categories : Job, Suffering

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